密碼:
注冊找密碼我的瀏覽
設首頁加收藏加書簽 ______

首頁每天學英語背單詞語法詞匯口語閱讀寫作翻譯寓言四級六級名著繞口令笑話外語動態詩歌散文雅思商務

您所在的位置: 大耳朵首頁 > 文章資料 > 輕松英語 >...> 經典名著 > 紅字 > 正文

站內搜索:

小提示:學單詞背單詞請到大耳朵免費在線背單詞系統
envy/['envi]/ n. 羨慕, 嫉妒 vt. 羨慕, 嫉妒...

第13章 海絲特的另一面

本文屬閱讀資料
Chapter 13 ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER




IN her late singular interview with Mr. Dimmesdale, Hester Prynne was shocked at the condition to which she found the clergyman reduced. His nerve seemed absolutely destroyed. His moral force was abased into more than childish weakness. It grovelled helpless on the ground, even while his intellectual faculties retained their pristine strength, or had perhaps acquired a morbid energy, which disease only could have given them. With her knowledge of a train of circumstances hidden from all others, she could readily infer that, besides the legitimate action of his own conscience, a terrible machinery had been brought to bear, and was still operating, on Mr. Dimmesdale's well-being and repose. Knowing what this poor fallen man had once been, her whole soul was moved by the shuddering terror with which he had appealed to her- the outcast woman- for support against his instinctively discovered enemy. She decided, moreover, that he had a right to her utmost aid. Little accustomed, in her long seclusion from society, to measure her ideas of right and wrong by any standard external to herself, Hester saw- or seemed to see- that there lay a responsibility upon her, in reference to the clergyman, which she owed to no other, nor to the whole world besides. The links that united her to the rest of human kind- links of flowers, or silk, or gold, or whatever the material- had all been broken. Here was the iron link of mutual crime, which neither he nor she could break. Like all other ties, it brought along with it its obligations.

Hester Prynne did not now occupy precisely the same position in which we beheld her during the earlier periods of her ignominy. Years had come and gone. Pearl was now seven years old. Her mother, with the scarlet letter on her breast, glittering in its fantastic embroidery, had long been a familiar object to the townspeople. As is apt to be the case when a person stands out in any prominence before the community, and, at the same time, interferes neither with public nor individual interests and convenience, a species of general regard had ultimately grown up in reference to Hester Prynne. It is to the credit of human nature, that, except where its selfishness is brought into play, it loves more readily than it hates. Hatred, by a gradual and quiet process, will even be transformed to love, unless the change be impeded by a continually new irritation of the original feeling of hostility. In this matter of Hester Prynne, there was neither irritation nor irksomeness. She never battled with the public, but submitted, uncomplainingly, to its worst usage; she made no claim upon it, in requital for what she suffered; she did not weigh upon its sympathies. Then, also, the blameless purity of her life during all these years in which she had been set apart to infamy, was reckoned largely in her favour. With nothing now to lose, in the sight of mankind, and with no hope, and seemingly no wish, of gaining anything, it could only be a genuine regard for virtue that had brought back the poor wanderer to its paths.

It was perceived, too, that while Hester never put forward even the humblest title to share in the world's privileges- further than to breathe the common air, and earn daily bread for little Pearl and herself by the faithful labour of her hands- she was quick to acknowledge her sisterhood with the race of man, whenever benefits were to be conferred. None so ready as she to give of her little substance to every demand of poverty; even though the bitter-hearted pauper threw back a gibe in requital of the food brought regularly to his door, or the garments wrought for him by the fingers that could have embroidered a monarch's robe. None so self-devoted as Hester, when pestilence stalked through the town. In all seasons of calamity, indeed, whether general or of individuals, the outcast of society at once found her place. She came, not as a guest, but as a rightful inmate into the household that was darkened by trouble; as if its gloomy twilight were a medium in which she was entitled to hold intercourse with her fellow-creatures. There glimmered the embroidered letter, with comfort in its unearthly ray. Elsewhere the token of sin, it was the taper of the sick-chamber. It had even thrown its gleam, in the sufferer's hard extremity, across the verge of time. It had shown him where to set his foot, while the light of earth was fast becoming dim, and ere the light of futurity could reach him. In such emergencies, Hester's nature showed itself warm and rich; a well-spring of human tenderness, unfailing to every real demand, and inexhaustible by the largest. Her breast, with its badge of shame, was but the softer pillow for the head that needed one. She was self-ordained a Sister of Mercy; or, we may rather say, the world's heavy hand had so ordained her, when neither the world nor she looked forward to this result. The letter was the symbol of her calling. Such helpfulness was found in her- so much power to do, and power to sympathise- that many people refused to interpret the scarlet A by its original signification. They said that it meant Able; so strong was Hester Prynne, with a woman's strength.

It was only the darkened house that could contain her. When sunshine came again, she was not there. Her shadow had faded across the threshold. The helpful inmate had departed, without one backward glance to gather up the meed of gratitude, if any were in the hearts of those whom she had served so zealously. Meeting them in the street, she never raised her head to receive their greeting. If they were resolute to accost her, she laid her finger on the scarlet letter and passed on. This might be pride, but was so like humility, that it produced all the softening influence of the latter quality on the public mind. The public is despotic in its temper; it is capable of denying common justice, when too strenuously demanded as a right; but quite as frequently it awards more than justice when the appeal is made, as despots love to have it made, entirely to its generosity. Interpreting Hester Prynne's deportment as an appeal of this nature, society was inclined to show its former victim a more benign countenance than she cared to be favoured with, or, perchance, than she deserved.

The rulers, and the wise and learned men of the community, were longer in acknowledging the influence of Hester's good qualities than the people. The prejudices which they shared in common with the latter were fortified in themselves by an iron framework of reasoning, that made it a far tougher labour to expel them. Day by day, nevertheless, their sour and rigid wrinkles were relaxing into something which, in the due course of years, might grow to be an expression of almost benevolence. Thus it was with the men of rank, on whom their eminent position imposed the guardianship of the public morals. Individuals in private life, meanwhile, had quite forgiven Hester Prynne for her frailty; nay, more, they had begun to look upon the scarlet letter as the token, not of that one sin, for which she had borne so long and dreary a penance, but of her many good deeds since. "Do you see that woman with the embroidered badge?" they would say to strangers. "It is our Hester- the town's own Hester- who is so kind to the poor, so helpful to the sick, so comfortable to the afflicted!" Then, it is true, the propensity of human nature to tell the very worst of itself, when embodied in the person of another, would constrain them to whisper the black scandal of bygone years. It was none the less a fact, however, that, in the eyes of the very men who spoke thus, the scarlet letter had the effect of the cross on a nun's bosom. It imparted to the wearer a kind of sacredness, which enabled her to walk securely amid all peril. Had she fallen among thieves, it would have kept her safe. It was reported, and believed by many, that an Indian had drawn his arrow against the badge, and that the missile struck it, but fell harmless to the ground.

The effect of the symbol- or, rather, of the position in respect to society that was indicated by it- on the mind of Hester Prynne herself, was powerful and peculiar. All the light and graceful foliage of her character had been withered up by this red-hot brand, and had long ago fallen away, leaving a bare and harsh outline, which might have been repulsive, had she possessed friends or companions to be repelled by it. Even the attractiveness of her person had undergone a similar change. It might be partly owing to the studied austerity of her dress, and partly to the lack of demonstration in her manners. It was a sad transformation, too, that her rich and luxuriant hair had either been cut off, or was so completely hidden by a cap, that not a shining lock of it ever once gushed into the sunshine. It was due in part to all these causes, but still more to something else, that there seemed to be no longer anything in Hester's face for Love to dwell upon; nothing in Hester's form, though majestic and statue-like, that Passion would ever dream of clasping in its embrace; nothing in Hester's bosom, to make it ever again the pillow of Affection. Some attribute had departed from her, the permanence of which had been essential to keep her a woman. Such is frequently the fate, and such the stern development, of the feminine character and person, when the woman has encountered, and lived through, an experience of peculiar severity. If she be all tenderness, she will die. If she survive, the tenderness will either be crushed out of her, or- and the outward semblance is the same- crushed so deeply into her heart that it can never show itself more. The latter is perhaps the truest theory. She who has once been woman, and ceased to be so, might at any moment become a woman again, if there were only the magic touch to effect the transfiguration. We shall see whether Hester Prynne were afterwards so touched, and so transfigured.

Much of the marble coldness of Hester's impression was to be attributed to the circumstance, that her life had turned, in a great measure, from passion and feeling, to thought. Standing alone in the world- alone, as to any dependence on society, and with little Pearl to be guided and protected- alone, and hopeless of retrieving her position, even had she not scorned to consider it desirable- she cast away the fragments of a broken chain. The world's law was no law for her mind. It was an age in which the human intellect, newly emancipated, had taken a more active and a wider range than for many centuries before. Men of the sword had overthrown nobles and kings. Men bolder than these had overthrown and rearranged- not actually, but within the sphere of theory, which was their most real abode- the whole system of ancient prejudice, wherewith was linked much of ancient principle. Hester Prynne imbibed this spirit. She assumed a freedom of speculation, then common enough on the other side of the Atlantic, but which our forefathers, had they known it, would have held to be a deadlier crime than that stigmatised by the scarlet letter. In her lonesome cottage by the seashore, thoughts visited her, such as dared to enter no other dwelling in New England; shadowy guests, that would have been as perilous as demons to their entertainer could they have been seen so much as knocking at her door.

It is remarkable, that persons who speculate the most boldly often conform with the most perfect quietude to the external regulations of society. The thought suffices them, without investing itself in the flesh and blood of action. So it seemed to be with Hester. Yet, had little Pearl never come to her from the spiritual world, it might have been far otherwise. Then, she might have come down to us in history, hand in hand with Ann Hutchinson, as the foundress of a religious sect. She might, in one of her phases, have been a prophetess. She might, and not improbably would, have suffered death from the stern tribunals of the period, for attempting to undermine the foundations of the Puritan establishment. But, in the education of her child, the mother's enthusiasm of thought had something to wreak itself upon. Providence, in the person of this little girl, had assigned to Hester's charge the germ and blossom of womanhood, to be cherished and developed amid a host of difficulties. Everything was against her. The world was hostile. The child's own nature had something wrong in it, which continually betokened that she had been born amiss- the effluence of her mother's lawless passion- and often impelled Hester to ask, in bitterness of heart, whether it were for ill or good that the poor little creature had been born at all.

Indeed, the same dark question often rose into her mind, with reference to the whole race of womanhood. Was existence worth accepting, even to the happiest among them? As concerned her own individual existence, she had long ago decided in the negative, and dismissed the point as settled. A tendency to speculation, though it may keep woman quiet, as it does man, yet makes her sad. She discerns, it may be, such a hopeless task before her. As a first step, the whole system of society is to be torn down, and built up anew. Then, the very nature of the opposite sex, or its long hereditary habit, which has become like nature, is to be essentially modified, before woman can be allowed to assume what seems a fair and suitable position. Finally, all other difficulties being obviated, woman cannot take advantage of these preliminary reforms, until she herself shall have undergone a still mightier change; in which, perhaps, the ethereal essence, wherein she has her truest life, will be found to have evaporated. A woman never overcomes these problems by any exercise of thought. They are not to be solved, or only in one way. If her heart chance to come uppermost, they vanish. Thus, Hester Prynne, whose heart had lost its regular and healthy throb, wandered without a clew in the dark labyrinth of mind; now turned aside by an insurmountable precipice; now starting back from a deep chasm. There was wild and ghastly scenery all around her, and a home and comfort nowhere. At times, a fearful doubt strove to possess her soul, whether it were not better to send Pearl at once to heaven, and go herself to such futurity as Eternal Justice should provide.

The scarlet letter had not done its office.

Now, however, her interview with the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale, on the night of his vigil, had given her a new theme of reflection, and held up to her an object that appeared worthy of any exertion and sacrifice for its attainment. She had witnessed the intense misery beneath which the minister struggled, or, to speak more accurately, had ceased to struggle. She saw that he stood on the verge of lunacy, if he had not already stepped across it. It was impossible to doubt, that, whatever painful efficacy there might be in the secret sting of remorse, a deadlier venom had been infused into it by the hand that proffered relief. A secret enemy had been continually by his side, under the semblance of a friend and helper, and had availed himself of the opportunities thus afforded for tampering with the delicate springs of Mr. Dimmesdale's nature. Hester could not but ask herself, whether there had not originally been a defect of truth, courage, and loyalty, on her own part, in allowing the minister to be thrown into a position where so much evil was to be foreboded, and nothing auspicious to be hoped. Her only justification lay in the fact, that she had been able to discern no method of rescuing him from a blacker ruin than had overwhelmed herself, except by acquiescing in Roger Chillingworth's scheme of disguise. Under that impulse, she had made her choice, and had chosen, as it now appeared, the more wretched alternative of the two. She determined to redeem her error, so far as it might yet be possible. Strengthened by years of hard and solemn trial, she felt herself no longer so inadequate to cope with Roger Chillingworth as on that night, abased by sin, and half maddened by the ignominy that was still new, when they had talked together in the prison-chamber. She had climbed her way, since then, to a higher point. The old man, on the other hand, had brought himself nearer to her level, or perhaps below it, by the revenge which he had stooped for.

In fine, Hester Prynne resolved to meet her former husband, and do what might be in her power for the rescue of the victim on whom he had so evidently set his gripe. The occasion was not long to seek. One afternoon, walking with Pearl in a retired part of the peninsula, she beheld the old physician, with a basket on one arm, and a staff in the other hand, stooping along the ground, in quest of roots and herbs to concoct his medicines withal.





第十三章 海絲特的另一面




在海絲特·白蘭最近園丁梅斯代爾先生的那次獨特的會面中,她發現牧師的健康狀況大為下降,并為此深感震驚。他的神經系統似乎已徹底垮了。他的精神力量已經衰頹,低得不如孩子。雖說他的智能還保持著原有的力量,或者說,可能已經達到了只有疾病才會造成的一種病態的亢奮,但他的精神力量已經到了無能為力的地步了。由于她了解一系列不為他人所知的隱情,她立即推斷出,在丁梅斯代爾先生自己良知的正?;顒又?,他的寧靜已經受到一部可怕的機器的干擾,而且那機器仍在開動,他還得忍受。由于她了解這個可憐的墮落的人的以往,所以當他嚇得心驚膽戰地向她——被人摒棄的女人——求救,要她幫他對付他靠本能發現的敵人的時候;她的整個靈魂都受到了震動。她還認為,他有權要她傾力相助。海絲特在長期的與世隔絕之中,已經不慣于以任何外界標準來衡量她的念頭的對或錯了,她懂得——或者似乎懂得——她對牧師負有責任,這種責任是她對任何別人、對整個世界都毋庸承擔的。她和別的人類的任何聯系——無論是花的、是絲的、是銀的,還是隨便什么物質的——全都斷絕了。然而他和她之間卻有著共同犯罪的鐵鏈,不管他還是她都不能打破。這一聯系,如同一切其它紐帶一樣,有與之緊相伴隨的義務。

海絲特·白蘭如今所處的地位已同她當初受辱時我們所看到的并不完全一樣了。春來秋往,年復一年。珠兒此時已經七歲了。她母親胸前閃著的刺繡絕妙的紅字,早已成為鎮上人所熟悉的目標。如果一個人在大家面前有著與眾不同的特殊地位,而同時又不干涉任何公共或個人的利益和方便,他就最終會贏得普遍的尊重,海絲特·白蘭的情況也正是如此除去自私的念頭占了上峰、得以表現之外,愛總要比恨來得容易,這正是人類本性之所在。只要不遭到原有的敵意不斷受到新的挑動的阻礙,恨甚至會通過悄悄漸進的過程轉變成愛。就海絲特。白蘭的情況而論,她既沒受到舊恨的挑動,也沒有增添新的慍怒。她從來與世無爭,只是毫無怨尤地屈從于社會的最不公平的待遇;她也沒有因自己的不幸而希冀什么報償;她同樣不依重于人們的同情。于是,在她因犯罪而喪失了權利、被迫獨處一隅的這些年月里,她生活的純潔無理,大大地贏得了人心。既然她在人們的心目中已經再無所失,再無所望,而且似乎也再無所愿去得到什么,那么這個可憐人的迷途知返,也只能被真誠地看作是美德感召的善果了。

人們也注意到:海絲特除去呼吸共同的空氣,并用雙手一絲不茍的勞作為她自已和小珠兒掙得每日的面包之外,對分享世上的特權連最卑微的要求都從不提出;反之,一有施惠于人的機會,她立即承認她與人類的姊妹之情。對于窮苦人的每一種需要,她比誰都快地就提供了她菲薄的支援;盡管那些心腸狠毒的窮人對她定期送到門口的食物或她用本可刺繡王袍的手指做成的衣物,竟會反唇相譏。在鎮上蔓延瘟疫的時候,誰也沒有海絲特那樣忘我地獻身。每逢災難,無論是普遍的還是個人的,這個為社會所摒棄的人,都會馬上挺身而出。她來到愁云緊鎖的家庭,并非作為客人,而是作為理應到來的親人;似乎那室內晦暗的微光成了她有權與她的同類進行交往的中介。她胸前繡著的字母閃著的非凡的光輝,將溫暖舒適帶給他人。那字母本來是罪惡的標記,此時在病室中卻成了一支燭光。在受難者痛苦的彌留之際,那字母甚至會將其光輝跨越時間的界限:在硯世的光亮迅速暗淡下去、而來世的光亮還沒照到死者之前,為他照亮踏腳的地方。在這種緊急情況下,海絲特顯示了她那可貴的溫厚秉性:那是人類溫情的可靠源泉,對任何真正的需要都有求必應,哪怕需要再大,也絕不會枯竭。她的胸口雖然佩著恥辱牌,對有所需要的人卻是柔軟的枕頭。她是自我委任的“慈善的姊妹”;或者,我們完全可以說,人世的沉重的手掌曾經這樣委任了她。但當時無論人世或她本人都沒有期待著她會不負所望。那字母成了她響應感召的象征。由于從她身上可以得到那么多的支援——她深富同情心又極肯助人——許多人都不肯再按本意來解釋那紅色的字母“A”了。他們說,那字母的意思是“能干”①;海絲特·白蘭只是個弱女子,但她太有力量了。

只有陰暗的住房才能容納她。當太陽再次升起的時候,她已經不在了。她的身影跨過門檻消逝了;這個大有助益的親人離去了,根本沒有回過頭來看一眼應得的感謝——如果她剛剛如此熱心地盡過力的那些人的心中肯于感激她的話。有時在街上遇到他們,她從來不抬頭接受他們的致意。如果他們執意要和她搭汕,她就用一個手指按任那紅宇,側身而過。這或許是驕傲,但極似謙卑,反正在眾人的心目中產生了謙卑品格的全部軟化人心的影響。公眾的情緒是蠻不講理的:當常理上的公道作為一種權利加以過分要求時,可能遭到拒絕;但是一旦完全投其所好、吁請暴虐的人們慷慨大度時,倒常常會得到超出公道的獎賞。由于社會把海絲特·白蘭的舉止解釋成這類性質的吁請,因此反倒寧可對其原先的犧牲品,顯示出一種比她所樂于接受的、或者說比她實際應得的更加寬厚的態度。

居民區的統治者和有識之士比起一般百姓花費了更長的時間才認識到海絲特的優秀品質的影響。他們對海絲特所共同持有的偏見,被推論的鐵框所禁錮,要想擺脫就得付出遠為堅韌的努力。然而,日復一日,他們臉上那種敵視的僵死的皺紋逐漸松弛下來,伴隨歲月的流逝,可以說變成了一種近乎慈愛的表情。那些身居要位、從而對公共道德負有監護之責的人的情況就是如此。與此同時,不擔任公務的普通百姓已經差不多徹底原諒了海絲特·白蘭因脆弱而造成的過失;不僅如此,他們還開始不再把那紅字看作是罪過的標記——她為此已忍受了多么長時間的陰慘慘的懲罰啊——而是當成自那時起的許多善行的象征?!澳憧匆娔莻€佩戴刺繡的徽記的好人了嗎?”他們會對陌生人這樣說?!八俏覀兊暮=z特——我們這鎮上自己的海絲特,她對窮人多么好心腸,對病人多么肯幫忙,對遭難的人多么有安慰??!”之后,出于人類本性中對別人說三道四的癖病,他們也確實悄聲說起若干年前那樁見不得人的丑事。不過,即使在講話人的心目中,那紅字仍有修女胸前的紅十字的效果。那紅字賦予其佩戴者一種神圣性,使她得以安度一切危難。假若她落入盜賊之手,那紅字也會保她平安無事。據傳,而且有不少人情以為真,有一個印第安人曾瞄準那紅字射箭,那飛箭雖然射中目標,卻落到了地上,對她毫無傷害。

那象征物,或者更確切地說,它所代表的社會地位,在海絲特·白蘭本人的頭腦中,有著強烈而獨特的作用。她性格中一切輕松優雅的綠葉,全都因那火紅的徽記而枯萎,并且早已落得精光,只剩下了光禿禿的粗糙的輪廓,如果說她還有朋友和伙伴的話,恐怕也早就為此而規避了。就連她人品上的魅力也經歷了類似的變化。這可能部分由于她著裝上故作嚴肅簡樸,部分因為她舉止上有意不動聲色。還有一個令人傷感的變化:她那滿頭豐盈的秀發,不是剪得短短的,就是讓一頂帽子完全遮住,以致從來沒有一綹在陽光下閃爍。除去這一切原因之外,再加上其它一些因素,看來,在海絲特的面孔上已不再有任何“愛情”可仔細揣摩之處,在海絲特那端莊和雕像般的身材上,不再有任何使“情欲”夢想投入其緊緊擁抱之處,在海絲特的胸膛中也不再有任何能夠使“慈愛”落枕之處了。作為一個女性本來不可或缺的某些秉性,在她身上已不復存在。當女人遭遇井經受了一場非同一般的苛刻的懲罰時,她那女性的品格通常會遭受這種命運并經歷這種嚴峻的變化。如果她只有柔情,她就會死掉。如果她僥幸活下去,她的柔情要么從她身上給排擠出去,要么在她心中給深深碾碎,永遠不再表露出來。這兩種情況在外人看來沒什么不同,而后者或許更符合實際。她既然曾經是女人,雖然一時不再是女人,但只消有魔法點化一下,完全可以隨時重新變成女人的。我們將要看到海絲特·白蘭以后會不會受到這種點化,再變成女人。

海絲特給人的那種如大理石般冰冷的印象,大部要歸咎于這一事實:她的生活,在很大程度上已經從情和欲變成了思想。她形只影單地立足于世上——孤獨得對社會無所依靠,只有小珠兒需要她指點和保護,——孤獨得對恢復她的地位已不抱希望,即使她還沒有鄙夷這種愿望,但是她已把斷裂的鎖鏈的碎片全然拋棄了。人世間的法律并非她心目中的法律。當年正處于人類智慧初獲解放的時代,比起以前的許多世紀,有著廣闊得多的天地任其馳騁。手執利劍的人已經推翻了王室貴胄。比他們更勇敢的人,則將與古代準則密切相關的古代偏見的完整體系,并非實際地,而是在理論范圍之內——這是那些王室貴胃真正的藏身之地——予以顛覆并重新安排了。海絲特·白蘭汲取了這一精神。她采取了思想自由的觀點,這在當年的大西洋彼岸本是再普通不過的事,但設若我們的移民祖先們對這種自由思想有所了解的話,她的觀點會被認為比紅字烙印所代表的罪惡還要致命的。在她那獨處海邊的茅舍里,拜訪她的那些思想是不敢進入新英格蘭的其它住宅的;假如有人看見這些影子般的客人輕叩她的門扉的話,就會把接待他們的主人視同魔鬼般危險了。

值得重視的是,那些具有最大膽的思想觀點的人,對于外界的清規戒律也最能泰然處之。他們滿足于思想觀點,并不想賦予其行動的血肉。海絲特的情況似乎就是這樣。不過,假若小珠兒未曾從精神世界來到她身邊的話,她的情況也許就會大不一樣了。那樣的話,她也許會同安妮·哈欽遜攜手并肩,作為一個教派的創始人,名標青史。她也許會在自己的某一時期成為一名女先知。她也許會——并非不可能——因企圖顛覆清教制度的基礎,而被當時嚴厲的法官處以死刑。但她的思想熱情,因為她成了母親,得以在教育孩子之中宣泄出去。上天把這小女孩交付給海絲特,就是要她保護女性的幼芽和蓓蕾,在眾多的困難中加以撫育和培養。一切都與她作對。世界在以她為敵。孩子的本性中含有欠妥之處,不斷表明她降臨到這個世界上是個錯誤——是她母親無視法律的激情的發泄,而且時常迫使海絲特辛酸地捫心自問:這個可憐的小家伙降生到世上,究竟是禍還是福。

事實上,她心中也時常升騰起涉及全人類女性的同樣陰郁的問題:即使對女性中最幸福的人來說,那人的生存有價值嗎?至于她自己本人的生存,她早已予以否定,并且作為已決之點不再重提。勤于思考,雖說可以對女人起到和對男人相同的作用——使人安靜下來,但卻使她感到傷感。也許她已經看清了自己面臨的任務是無望的。首先,整個社會制度要徹底推翻并予以重建。其次,男人的本性,或者說由于世代沿襲的習慣面變得象是本性的東西,應該從本質上加以改變,然后婦女才可能取得似是公平合理的地位。最后,即使排除掉一切其它困難,婦女也必須先進行一番自身的更有力的變化,才能享有這些初步改革的成果,然而到那時,,凝聚著她的女性的最真實的生命的精髓,或許巳然蒸發殆盡了。一個女人,無論如何運用她的思維,也無法解決這些問題?;蛟S只有一條出路才能解決這些問題:如果她的精神能夠主宰一切,這些問題便會不復存在。然面,由于海絲特·白蘭的心臟已經不再有規律而健康的搏動,她便只有茫無頭緒地徘徊在思考的幽暗迷宮之中:時而因無法攀越的峭壁而轉彎,時而因深陷的斷層而返回。她周圍是一道恐怖的野景,四處不見舒適的家園。不時有一種可怕的疑慮攫佐她的靈魂,不知是否該把珠兒馬上送上天庭,自己也走向“永恒的裁判”所斷定的來世,才更好些。

那個紅字尚未克盡厥責。

但是此時,自從那天夜里丁梅斯代爾先生夜游時他倆見了一面以來,她又有了一個新的題目去思索;在她看來,為了達到那一目標,她簡直值得耗盡一切精力并作出一切犧牲。她已經目睹了牧師是在多么劇烈的痛苦之中掙扎著——或者說得更準確些,是怎樣停止掙扎的。她親眼看到,他已經站到發瘋的邊緣——如果說他還沒有跨過那邊緣處于瘋狂狀態的話。無庸置疑,不管自責的秘刺中有什么致痛的功效,那只提供救援之手又在那螫刺中注入了致他死命的毒液。一個秘密的敵人,假借朋友和救護者之名,時刻不離他的方前左右,并借此機會撬動丁梅斯代爾先生秉性中纖弱的鎖簧。海絲特不禁自問:是否由于她這方面在真誠、勇氣及忠貞上本來存在著缺陷,才造成牧師被拋進兇隙橫生、毫無祥兆的境地呢?她唯一能夠自我辯解的就是:除去默許羅杰·齊靈渥斯隱姓埋名之外,她原本別無它法使牧師免遭比她承受的還要陰暗的毀滅。在那種動機之下,她作出了自己的抉擇,而如今看來,她所選定購卻是二者之間更加不幸的方案。她決心在盡可能的情況下來補償自己的過失。經過多年艱苦和嚴正的考驗,她已經堅強有力多了,自信不象當年那個夜晚那樣不是羅杰·齊靈渥斯的對手了:當晚他倆在牢房中談話時,她是剛剛肩負犯罪的重壓,并為羞恥之心逼得半瘋的。從那晚起,她已在自己的道路上攀登到一個新高度了。面另一方面;那個老人呢,由于不顧一切地尋求復仇,則使自己降低到同她接近或許比她還低的水平了。

終于,海絲特·白蘭打定主意去會她原先的丈夫,盡她的全力來解救顯然已落入對方掌握之中的犧牲品。沒過多久;她便找到了機會;一天下午,在半島上一處荒無人煙的地點,她帶著珠兒散步,剛好看見那老醫生,一手挽著籃子,另一只手往著拐杖,正彎著腰在地上一路搜尋可以配藥的樹根和藥草。

①“A”本是“通奸”(Adultery)的首字,現在被人們釋作“能干”(Able)的首字。
您是否對這篇資料想說點什么?歡迎評論或者糾錯,或者提交填空題答案! 您也可以立即
紅字
高瞻遠矚
放眼全球
推薦資源
最新社區精華帖子更多>>
  • 走遍美國教學版
    走遍美國教學版
  • 哈利學前班[英語兒歌]
    哈利學前班[英語兒歌]
  • 海綿寶寶 英文版
    海綿寶寶 英文版
  • 風中的女王第1季
    風中的女王第1季
經典學習方法更多>>

聽力排行

試題

視聽

歌曲

電影

高考聽力模擬4101
2009年高考英語聽力(安徽卷)MP3——大耳朵英語免費下載
初中英語情景反應
高考聽力模擬4012-14
38 “How to” Books
1999年1月四級聽力04
2005年高考聽力模擬1108-11
06年6月四級聽力11-14
2005年6月六級聽力09
00年6月六級聽力14-16
新概念英語MP3第一冊lesson3
用Mp3背六級單詞069
從ABC到流利口語unit13
背誦為王第四冊第52課
新四級必考4000詞3+2快速記憶法:起步篇·基礎詞匯 07
VOA慢速 People in America - Doctor Spock, 1903-1998_ The World’s Most Famous Baby Doctor 09-3-15
VOA慢速 Science in the News - Two Inventions That Helped Level the Playing Field Against Bullets, Car
英語故事lesson 5:The Three Happy Brothers
女人香19
大學體驗英語聽說教程第四冊U13
Jonas Brothers--When you look me in the eyes
劉德華 - 我恨我癡心 - 英文 原版
Chris Garneau - Fireflies
知行英語歌曲精講:18歲音樂奇才美少女Lene Marlin—Unforgivable Sinner (聽歌學英語 listen and Share)
Adele - Chasing Pavements
《飄雪》韓文版《對不起我愛你》主題曲
小小少年德語版 kleine kinder Kleine Sorgen
2002年的第一場雪 英文版
Augustana -- Sweet And Low
Thompson Square -- Are You Gonna Kiss Me Or Not
小熊維尼與跳跳虎英文版 第一季 第1集
巴布工程師英文版 第1集 小貓阿皮不見了
小伙伴英語兒歌 第1集 小星星
酷艾英語系列之光棍節
看電影學英語系列之冒牌家庭
海綿寶寶全集 第1集
小馬寶莉 第1集
幼兒雙語兒歌系列之ABC字母歌
Bingo教你說美語之如何用英語敘舊
Hello Teddy洪恩幼兒英語1
文章資料目錄導航
經典名著 四六級考試 IELTS雅思 聽說讀寫能力 在線語法詞典 行業英語一 行業英語二 生活英語 輕松英語 專題英語
雙城記 寶島
戰爭與和平
悲慘的世界
傲慢與偏見
讀圣經學英語
八十天環游地球
考試動態
學習資料
歷年真題
模擬試題
心得技巧
學習方法經驗
考試動態
考試介紹
考試輔導
歷年真題
模擬試題
心得技巧
英語聽力
英語口語
英語閱讀
英語寫作
英語翻譯
英語詞匯
名詞 冠詞數詞
動詞 動名詞
代詞 形容詞
情態 獨立主格
倒裝 主謂一致
連詞 虛擬語氣
職場英語
外貿英語
商務英語
銀行英語
文化英語
體育英語
房地產英語
會計英語
金融證券
醫療英語
計算機英語
公務員英語
實用英語
電話英語
旅游英語
購物英語
市民英語
賓館英語
好文共賞
英語文庫
名人演說
小說寓言
諺語名言繞口令
笑話幽默 詩歌
笨霖筆記
CNN英語魏
實用九句
雙語閱讀
發音講解
分類詞匯
?
免責聲明:本站只提供資源播放平臺,如果站內部分資源侵犯您的權益,請您告知,我們會立即處理。
Copyright © 2010-2017 大耳朵英語  京ICP備10010568號 | 京公網安備 11010802020324號

微信掃一掃手機學英語 關閉
微博掃一掃手機學英語 關閉
QQ掃一掃手機學英語 關閉
申华控股股票行情走 0.244105s